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DIY Video DIY Recipe Tropical Paradise Juice

Video DIY Recipe: Tropical Paradise Juice

This is a yet another very simple juice recipe. But its tastes epic. Its delicious. As always important is that you get quality materials in this case the fruit should be organic even better if you know where its grown or who is harvesting it and how. You absolutely dont want to be consuming glyphosate herbicides in your “juice”. As you may know a recent test in 2019 shows that most beers and wine even organic ones had traces of glyphosate herbicide.

Its very likely that you wont be able to find the Babaco (carica pentagona) fruit in your country unless you live in Ecuador or you are just happen to be a very lucky person 🙂 All the other ingredients are rather international know a days.

Micro Video: How to make Tropical Paradise Juice like at PermaTree

Juice ingredients – try to get organic fruits

  • 1x Babaco (else try to get a juice local fruit with not to much taste)
  • 1x Passion Fruit
  • 1x Bitter Mandarin (tastes similar to lemon or lime but different)
  • 4x Bananas

Step by step guide

  1. Prepare the juicer
  2. Cut some of the Babaco into the juicer
  3. Add the content of the passion fruit also into the juicer
  4. Add only the juice of the bitter mandarin without the seeds
  5. Add the bananas. Cut them in small pieces so that all fits into the juicer.
  6. Add 1-2 centimer of filtered water.
  7. Run the juicer for 1-2 minutes.
  8. And its ready to serve.

Now if you like cold drinks. Dont use ice. Use your brain. 🙂 Let the fruits rest in fridge for a few hours before preparing the juice and when you will make it. The juice will be fresh. If you like it very cold put half of the fruits into the freezer for a few hours and you will have a VERY cold juice.

Enjoy.

Clearing zone-G for additional Fruit Tree PolyCultures

When we talk about cutting pasture grass. It’s not the same thing in a non tropical climate like in Europe. The grass here is GIANT Elephant grass (the African Pennisetum purpureum, also known as giant king) which grows up tu 3 meters tall and is very thick up to 1cm! Check out the photos.

 

So it’s a real challenge to cut it. Even more to get rid of it. The only natural solution we found so far after doing various experiments over the period of 24month is, 1st cut it and 3 weeks later when it has grown back to 20cm high, we fumigate it with a natural solution which contains urea (Chemical formula‎: ‎CH4N2O) / nitrogen (N). Then the nitrogen will be sucked up by all the Gramineae (family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as grasses,) and within 14 days the Gramineae-plant starts to dry out. We have a success rate of about 90%. So after a while we have to go back once or twice to get rid of all the grasses. Which obviously 🙄 are not endemic to this region and where brought with the idea of removing all the Amazon jungle forest to make space for more cattle farming … Since the beginning of the colonization in the 1960s, around 15% of the Amazon forest has been removed through agricultural practices. Source 2003 – Cattle ranching in the Amazon rainforest

 

The giant grass will be replaced with the following polyculture according to our previous learnings with the adaptive keyline access path with Arachis Pintoi & Vetiver grass.

 

Drone Bird View Video

Nutrition – Flexitarianism

Written by Matthew Livingston and originally published at the mattliving.com blog

DISCLAIMER: These are my thoughts and experiences on what can be a deeply cultural, charged and personal topic: diet. There is a lot we don’t know, especially when it comes to what a sustainable diet is. For one, most studies have been centred in high-income Western countries (Jones et al., 2016); it’s also still largely unclear exactly what a “healthy diet” should consist of, nevertheless what a truly sustainable society would look like. Integrating all of these concepts is an enormous challenge.

“Defining what represents a macro-nutritionally balanced diet remains an open question and a high priority in nutrition research.” (Song et al., 2016)


Before coming to the Ranch, I had been vegetarian for about a year and a half, predominantly for environmental reasons. Currently, I would probably classify as a “flexitarian” or “ethical omnivore”, as are most of the denizens here, with the majority of the diet being plant-based. Ideally ~95% of our calories would come from plants, due to extensive research on the health, longevity and environmental benefits of eating a predominantly plant-based diet (123). A 95:5 plant to meat ratio is manifest in all of the Blue Zones (4), examples being Okinawa & Sardinia, where people live the longest and most healthful lives in the world. Allow me to explain how I came to this decision and why I’m sticking with it for now…

My original swap to vegetarianism was influenced by my desire to live “more sustainably”, and healthily, as it is for many people now. I saw the documentary film “Cowspiracy” (bear with me) and this initiated my research into food and agriculture, which carried over into my environmental sustainability degree. It was also enough to shift one of my fundamental behavioural patterns – my diet. It was a little tough going at first,  but I soon found that I didn’t miss eating meat much at all. I felt a bit better about myself, “knowing” that I wasn’t contributing as much to global warming, as my research indicated that changing one’s diet can be one of the most impactful ways of reducing your carbon footprint (Aleksandrowicz et al., 2016)…


Fast forward to May 2017, when I travelled to Ridgedale Permaculturefarm in Sweden for my Permaculture Design Course with Richard Perkins. Richard is a proud meat-eater, being particularly fond of freshly line-caught fish, properly cured bacon & sausages, and a nice, juicy steak from locally reared, regeneratively farmed livestock, as viewers of his Youtube channel will know. He was keen to point out that there are in fact “no ecosystems on this planet that exist without animals driving the nutrient cycling” (Perkins, 2016). Ecosystems depend on the cycling of nutrients (and minerals) in order to function, and these nutrients can be accumulated, dispersed and concentrated by animals in such a way as to benefit the whole.

One beautiful example of this is the salmon of British Columbia, that feed the bears, eagles, forests and pretty much everything else that lives there with nitrogen and other accumulated minerals from the ocean when they return to their spawning grounds. Another was the Great Plains of North America, where tens of millions of bison roamed. These prairie lands were extraordinarily diverse habitats for a multitude of co-evolved flora & fauna, micro and macroscopic. Now they have predominantly been turned into endless fields of corn, wheat and soybeans, using fossil-fuel powered machinery and chemicals to maximise profit whilst depleting soil of not only its nutrients, contributing to erosion and nitrogen runoff, but its life too.


Regenerative Agriculture aims to work differently. The challenge is to maintain healthy yields and livelihoods whilst simultaneously enriching soil, biodiversity and ecosystems and improving the system’s ability to regenerate itself. Through various mechanisms, we can actually draw down carbon from the atmosphere and store it in soils and vegetation. What’s more, animals can help achieve this goal. Grazing animals such as bison co-evolved with grasses (which are extremely efficient sunlight accumulators, astronomically more so than our photovoltaic panels), such that massive herds would graze through perennial grasses whilst defecating and trampling the remnants down to create a mulch that left the soil covered, before moving on. The grasses would get a natural fertiliser boost but wouldn’t be eaten down completely, which meant that they could grow back and not have to deplete their soil nutrient reserves. Over time, this kind of rotational grazing, especially when well-managed, can build significant amounts of soil. At Ridgedale, they have employed it, along with other techniques such as Keyline Design, to build over 6 inches of soil in just four seasons. There is even a project called Pleistocene Park in northern Siberia that hopes to repopulate the Mammoth Steppe, which historically supported one of the largest densities of herbivores in history and could function as a massive carbon sink. Surely we need animals as a part of our (agri)culture, then?


Well, you might point out that ruminant animals like cows and sheep that we are now cultivating in extremely large numbers produce methane as a part of their digestion, a greenhouse gas with ~30 times more “global warming potential” than CO2. Greenhouse gas accountancy is a complex topic and there is still significant debate as to whether the sequestered carbon pays off the methane produced during the lifecycle of the animal (see Garnett et al., 2017 & P.P.S.); that said, it’s also possible that the earth historically supported much larger numbers of herbivores, many of which were likely driven extinct by humans thus contributing to ecosystem disruption, as discussed in Sapiens and elsewhere (78).

Another common argument is that eating animals is calorically inefficient when we could eat what we feed them. I would say this is a partially valid point in that animals, especially cattle, often need more land and water to produce than their plant-based counterparts, but it’s less valid when discussing purely grass-fed animals whose rumens are evolutionarily designed to digest grass, which most of us humans obviously don’t do very well; this suggests that if you want to obtain food from a parcel of land that wants to be grassland, you could force it to be not grassland, or you could manage and eat animals that are designed to live in and perpetuate that ecosystem. The Sustainable Food Trust goes so far as to say “the only sustainable way to obtain food from grassland is to graze it with ruminants”, which does sound a bit extreme especially considering that rabbits and geese are just two examples of non-ruminants that can be grass-fed. Livestock especially are getting a lot of bad rap due to the significant environmental damages of deforestation for pasture (an example of forcing an ecosystem to be something it doesn’t want to be) and their methane and nitrous oxide emissions (Steinfield, 2006; Stoll-Kleemann, 2015; many others).

Whilst not negligible, I’m concerned that many of the livestock systems under scrutiny aren’t representative of best-practice regenerative methods and that there is definitely the problem of reducing a living creature to the efficiency metric of its greenhouse gas emissions per kg of meat without considering all of its other beneficial functions and services; this metric has led people to the conclusion that “landless systems” or feedlots are better for the environment (Garnett et al., 2017), despite animal welfare being known to be abysmal and where wastes are concentrated and rarely dealt with properly. These factors go against the principles of regenerative agriculture and thus wouldn’t be allowed to continue; yes, grass-fed cows and other ruminants require more land, but we could limit the amount of land devoted to raising them and thereby reduce the total stock and consumption. In this manner, by allowing animals and ecosystems to express their true functions and behaviours according to the co-evolutionary properties of the animals and their environments, it might be possible for humans to yield ethically sound animal-derived food that positively contributes to the whole-earth system.


There are also a few points I would like to discuss with regards to plant-based (especially vegan) diets. Vegetables and whole grains, which form the staples of most healthful plant-based diets, as well as fruits and nuts, obviously take some amount of energy to produce, thus we need to consider where this energy or fertility comes from. We also need to consider where the dietary fat, protein and vitamin B12 will come from (amongst other nutrients/minerals) when meat is abstained from completely; I believe it is possible to meet your protein needs on a plant-based diet (Ranganathan et al., 2016), but doing so in the dead of winter in a temperature climate in a sustainable manner might be more difficult (are the Inuits an unsustainable people?)

Even the “most sustainable”farming methods I am aware of (which may or may not be organic certified) acknowledge that the inputs to grow food ultimately have to come from biological nitrogen fixation, conversion via animals, or inorganic elements (chemicals). For example, compost is vital to almost all organic, traditional and regenerative farms, and often incorporates animal manure, which adds additional nitrogen and biology to the soil and ultimately to the plants. The only exceptions I can think of to this would be Jean-Pain compost (which uses only wood chips and water) and Masanobu Fukuoka style rice and winter wheat cultivation, where the straw from the previous crop was left on the field as mulch and nutrients. Even the ancient and incredibly successful Meso-american Chinampas systems, as well as the rice cultivating nations of China, South Korea and Japan, have utilised ferti-irrigation techniques comprised predominantly of the wastes of fish as nutrients. Thus, since no sustainable farming methods can use inorganic chemicals derived from fossil fuels, most consumers that eat a purely plant-based diet are still deriving their nutrients from (the functioning and inclusion of) animals… Perhaps the question then becomes can, should and how would we integrate animals into our farming systems without eating them?


I’m still considering the implications of these questions and my position on the frequency and type of my animal consumption. We’ve had four “Pig Parties” in the four months I’ve been here at the Ranch, and chicken about once a week on average, all of which was reared and slaughtered locally in Mastatal. This corresponds pretty well to a 95:5 plant:meat ratio (see P.P.P.S.). For the first of the two pigs I visited the farm where it lived, died and bore witness to how it was processed; for the second we had an intro on how to properly butcher a pig. I think this is a crucial missing link for the majority of meat consumers and we need to continue building awareness of the realities of industrial slaughterhouses. Both of the animals I visited lived outdoors in tropical home gardens, feeding on bananas and other food scraps, although I’ve now been told it’s likely they were fed some concentrated feed. Pigs will eat just about anything, including chickens – they are probably the ultimate organic material recycling animal. Feeding farm animals to other farm animals is illegal in many parts of the world, but we need to always be searching for ways to turn “waste” into food, and pigs are one effective way of doing so. They in turn provide manure to feed back into the ecosystem and, when the time is right, are themselves converted into protein, fat and flavour for dozens of people for multiple meals. They can also provide piglets so that the system can continue, perhaps indefinitely. Without pigs in this system, you would have to replace the dietary protein and fat, which in our climate would likely come from more annual beans and palm oil from cleared forest land, as well as find another method of recycling the food scraps (vermi-compost is great, but doesn’t provide food in return).


Based on this discussion, I would like to present my initial take on a scale to classify diets based on their ability to be sustained, from best to worst:

  1. Local regenerative
  2. Local organic certified
  3. Non-local regenerative
  4. Non-local organic certified (many vegetarians/vegans in cities)
  5. Local conventional
  6. Non-local conventional (most consumers)

Where locality is on a scale from hyper-local (within 5km), to local (within 50km), to regional (within 250km), to non-local (further than 250km). Another important variable that goes hand-in-hand with locality is seasonality. Thus a checklist for regenerative dietary choices might be something like:

  1. Is it local? (as the crow flies to place of origin): <=5km — <=50km — <=250km — >250km — Don’t know
    1. Does it come from your garden, your nearest farmer, your nearest market, or another country?
  2. Is it in season?: Yes — No — Don’t know
    1. Are you regularly eating avocado, chocolate or coffee in winter in a temperate climate? What can you eat and drink locally and seasonally to replace imported goods you habitually desire?
    2. Are you consuming fermented foods and beverages? The Japanese have one of the strongest food cultures (called Washoku 和食) and longest lived people in the world, and 5/6 of their staple food ingredients are fermented foods. Fermentation is not only extremely beneficial for your health, but ties in beautifully with preserving the abundance of the harvest.
  3. Was it produced regeneratively?
    1. Did it build soil and/or sequester carbon?: Yes — No — Don’t know
    2. Did its production support local farmer(s)/community? Yes — No — Don’t know
    3. Did it use no chemicals and no or very little fossil-fuel powered machinery in its production? Yes — No — Don’t know

It is my guess that many consumers would tick No or Don’t Know for every field, whilst falling into the worst category (non-local conventional). We need to shift first from ignorance to awareness before we can shift to understanding and action – behavioural change is flipping hard! All I can say right now is the link between diet and planetary health is crucial in navigating our transition towards a sustainable prosperity.


Let me be clear: plant-based diets are absolutely a big part of the solution, and there are many cases (including the average Western diet) where meat consumption should be reduced, but nevertheless animals aren’t the enemy. Vegans, vegetarians and ethical omnivores have a common enemy, and that is industrial agriculture (especially feedlots, which are completely awful). Meat in moderation, i.e. Meat Mondays as opposed to Meatless Mondays, may be a way forward for many people, rather than jumping straight to 100% plant-based diets based on quinoa and avocados shipped in from someplace slightly more exotic. I think this better follows the Transition Ethic that Rob Hopkins thoroughly emphasises via the Transition Network, by meeting people where they’re at – there is an irrepressible demand for meat due to complex sociocultural factors that will take time to shift away from, but if we can make ethical compromises that simultaneously shift mindsets, we will be well on our way to a more symbiotic relationship between humans and Nature.

May The Triforce (Plants, Animals and Fungi!) Be With You!


P.S. Follow the debate here, and here.

P.P.S. For the adventurous you can read my Regenerative Agriculture Brief and explore the references there too!

P.P.P.S. Three meals a day with chicken for 52 meals and pork for 12 meals in a year = (365*3-(52+12))/(365*3)*100 = 94.2%.


References, a.k.a. some of the things I’ve read:

 

PermaTree’s productive and nutritional capacity. Summary and conclusion.

The completion of this SIP (Self Initiated Project) during August 2017 demanded many volunteer hours which, according to Yago and Btina Veith, permacultors and owners of the Yantza farm, located in the south east of Ecuador, and creators of the PermaTree.org project, is innovative. Since it combines the technique and practice of permaculture, with the science of nutrition in detail.

PermaTree’s productive and nutritional capacity.

The challenge was to analyze what nutrients would be provided to the people of the farm in the short, medium and long term, based on the variety of crops sown, and predict and forecast how much food would be available, to uncover the capacity of future supply.

Those questions were answered. The most important species, representing the not inconsiderable number of more than thirty, among fruits, vegetables, cereals, legumes and nuts were taken into account. These are the food groups that I consider indispensable, and without contraindications, to develop a full and long life.

Summary and conclusion.

The current 4.5 hectares allow for food and economic self-sufficiency of at least 10 families after 7 to 10 years.

Considering the following important clarifications:

  • Family: 2 adults + 2 children;
  • 3 hectares are dedicated to cultivation for commercial economic purposes;
  • 1.5 hectares are dedicated to the edible forest and orchard;
  • Food wholly of vegetable origin;
  • It is understood that the economic self-sufficiency generated by the commercial activity is allocated primarily to the other 2 basic necessities: clothing and housing.
  • Development and production of food for tropical climate.
  • Location of the property: 800 mosl.

This portion of the farm property represents only 11% of what PermaTree will allocate to the development of edible forest and human settlements, being only 6% when compared to the total size of the farm, as well as a large part of the secondary native forest , almost 50%, will remain intact.

List of food components planted / planted in 4.5 Has:

PermaTree Crops

Most important crops, in order of greatest quantity to minor:

  1. Guanabana Annona muricata (Graviola, 3 hectares, own consumption and commercial purpose),
  2. Banana and banana Musa (100 main + children: approx 600 units, 10 with fruits in sight),
  3. Papaya Carica (Mamón, 15 growing trees, 7 with fruits in sight, incalculable seeds scattered),
  4. Chirimoya Annona cherimola (15 young plants),
  5. Yucca Manihot esculenta (Yucca, 20 x 20 m),
  6. Coconut palm Cocos nucifera (40 young plants),
  7. Cacao Theobroma (20 Amazonian natives bearing fruit, 5 grafts bearing fruit),
  8. Pineapple Ananas comosus (Ananá, 40 young plants with complications due to small herbivores such as rabbits),
  9. Avocado Persea americana (Avocado, not yet fruit, 40 between seedlings and young plants),
  10. Corn Zea Mays (30mx15m),
  11. Sweet lemon Citrus limetta (Lima, 5 trees already bearing fruit),
  12. Lemongrass Citrus limonia (acid, 5 trees already bearing fruit),
  13. Orange Citrus sinensis (1 tree bearing fruit, 20 planted),
  14. Mango Mangifera indica (10 trees planted, one adult).
  15. Mandarina Citrus reticulata or mandarin (1 tree bearing fruit, 10 young trees),
  16. Grapefruit Citrus paradisi (Grapefruit, 15 young trees planted),
  17. Frutipan Artocarpus altilis (10 young trees planted),
  18. Grape of Pourouma cecropiifolia (Caimarón, 25 young plants),
  19. Chonta palm tree Bactris gasipaes (Chontaduro, 3 with fruit in sight, 8 young plants),
  20. Rice sativa rice (10 m x 10 m, experimental),
  21. Passion fruit Passiflora edulis (8 m x 10 m),
  22. Yellow Pitahaya Selenicereus megalanthus (Dragonfruit, 10 m x 13 m, approx 40 plants),
  23. Macadamia nut Macadamia integrifolia (5 seedlings),
  24. Carambola Averrhoa carambola (Starfruit, 2 plantines),
  25. Chaya Cnidoscolus aconitifolius (Spinach tree, 4 young plants)
  26. Naranjilla Solanum quitoense (Lulo, 2 young plants with fruit in sight),
  27. Beans adzuki and others Vigna angularis and Phaseolus vulgaris (Beans, experimental row),
  28. Lentils Lens culinaris (experimental row),
  29. Huerta / vegetables: experimental, some cherry tomatoes, peppers, pumpkin, carrot.

Bees: The farm counts on bees that collaborate in the natural process of pollination, favoring the reproduction of the diverse cultivated species. In addition, honey production is planned, which may be for consumption and commercial purposes. The nutritional benefits of honey, summarized in a large contribution of energy through its high carbohydrate content (80%), are not part of this work.

Author: Juan Manuel Esteche
Student of Nutrition at the Barceló Foundation (Bs As, Argentina), and independent researcher. Currently touring South America.

If you are interested in knowing the work in detail, which provides information on the macro (carbohydrates, proteins and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins, antioxidants, phytochemicals and minerals) of each food planted or planted, as well as the variety and quantity exact that you must generate to achieve PRODUCTIVE AND NUTRITIONAL SELF-RESPONSIBILITY, you can send an e-mail to juanesteche80 @ gmail.com.

Healthy Tasty Food

The project PermaTree was mainly created because we – Btina and myself – wanted to eat healthy tasty food in our future. We at PermaTree focus on healthy nutrition aka healthy food “diet”.

Definition of diet: “A selection of nutritious substance that people or animals eat or drink, in order to maintain life and growth.”

It’s something many understand totally different. For some it’s about following a specific diet. For others it’s about losing weight. And for us it’s really and simply about eating tasty fresh healthy foods to gain energy and positive vibes. We embrace diverse nutrition with some exceptions due to current location limitations and because most of the fruit trees we have been planting will need between 2.5 and 8 years until we can harvest the fruits.

 

Most people think we at PermaTree are vegetarians because we do not eat or cook meat at home. The meat storage in our freezer is only for our for legged friends, our two dogs. Meat or overleft from cows which vendors do not sell to their customers. And to be honest the meat quality here in South America is not comparable with Europe. It’s more like a gum than a juicy piece of meat. So, if there is good meat around, sure we take the chance to eat meat once a time. But we are absolutely not dependent on meat. More important for us is, to know the source of where the food is coming from. Who is the producer and how is it treated, animals wise and also the entire growth process of a plant foods (organic VS GMO/hormone/chemicals).

What type of food do we eat at finca PermaTree?

A typical day involves a big bowl of seasonal tropical fruit (Banana, Papaya and maybe Mango) with oatmeal and fruit juice for breakfast. Lunch could be rice with peanut butter, salad and carrots, lentils with shredded coconut meat. Dinner may be lighter like Papaya or just some rice with eggs. We focus on seasonal, partly organic and local produce we purchase at the market and harvest as much of our own food from the Finca as we can.

So, for example plant wise speaking they need calcium too, which is most likely coming from bones. Meaning dead animals or dead human beings if you want so. And many people go and buy some fertilizer and do not know how it is made. So roughly said, the vegetables and fruit you eat have eaten bones to be able to grow big and juice! What do you think now? There is always something missing in this circle. As a circle example we get born, life and on on the end we are going back to earth where we decompose and create nutrient for plants or animals and so life is full of circles.

For us organic fruits, vegetables, grains creatively mixed together is what we are thankful after a hard working day. Most tropical fruits have so many health benefits we can’t even talk about it, because it would take more than just a dozen of blog articles. In a nutshell if it’s a natural organic fruit you can be sure it’s healthy, if it’s from the tropical climate it may be a so called superfruit and even more healthy. Why? Because those deemed “super” by nutrition scientists are packed with antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals, and other nutrients that can help you live longer, look better, and even prevent disease.

Papaya Natural Fruit Juice - no sugar no milk

As soon as vendors use GMO/hormones for their animals or chemicals for their plants, it is most likely because they can sell it in very big amounts and therefore industrial food production. Better not to consume. Industrial food is just to make money not to sell nutrition. It’s about selling the least expensive food-material best packaged at the highest price. For profit. It’s all about the profit and the net gain and worth of the industry. Your health is not part of this equation.

 

Industrial production is NOT good for our environment, animals or even directly for us humans regarding our health! This is the most significant fact we have to keep in mind, more than following any diet in this world.

Which we, without hesitation, calling by there names: Paleo, Vegetarian, Vegan, Halal, Kosher, Low-fat, Raw-food, Gluten-free diet, Diabetic diet, Carbohydrate Diet, etc. These diets have to do with religion or a specific belief or just a current trend. 99% of all diets are also way to extreme at the end of the day. Also depending on your body type (Metabolism) how fast your body can burn energy, some diets may work for one person but not for another.

Amira preparing another Healthy Lunch Breakfast: Tropical Fruit Salad and Huevos revueltos Breakfast: Tropical Fruit Salad with Papaya

Our goal at PermaTree in Ecuador is to produce locally all of our food we consume there. Sounds like something obvious but it takes time to get there.

Others may want to, because they want to live healthier or lose weight. There is also currently a trend within athletes which are vegan and strong. Sounds good but most still do not care where food is coming from and if it contains chemicals or not…  Which we think is also a very significant detail.  

Healthy Food Recommend from PermaTree

  • Zero sugar “diet’ = more energy and just another addiction.
  • Cook all of the meals at home. If possible don’t eat outside, no control there.
  • Get the produce (vegetables & fruit) from nearby local markets or farms, always ask where it comes from you may be surprised by the answers from I dont have a clue to 3000km away.
  • Focus on consuming the good fats (Monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat) and not the bad fats (saturated fat and trans fat). Examples foods would be: nuts (coconut, almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans) vegetable oils (olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil) peanut butter and almond butter avocado, salmon, herring, sardines, trout, walnuts and all kind of seeds (sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds).
  • Obviously – Don’t eat processed foods. anything in a packaging with a brand and
  • If possible eat raw vegetables, fruits, etc.
  • shiny slogans
  • Do you own research about food and listen to your body
  • Experiment new fresh food and mixes

HowTo Make Raw Energy Bars

Making Raw Energy Bars & Why We Should Eat More Raw Foods

Today we would like to share a new recipe with you, which is very simple to make and does not require any baking or cooking. These raw energy bars are the perfect snack on the go, providing you with a combination of complex carbs, healthy fats and proteins. So let’s get started!

energybars

First thing you do is building the base made with

  • Rolled oats
  • Banana
  • Peanut Butter

Optional add-ins could be

  • Raw chocolate
  • Shredded coconut
  • Some walnuts
  • Raisins or other dried fruits
  • Raw cane sugar honey
  • Chia seeds, flax, sesame
    OR
  • whatever you have on hand! Feel free to get creative ☺

Now all you have to do is mash the bananas, mix it with the peanut butter (best thing is to use them ~ 1:1), and then add the dry ingredients until you reach a sticky consistency. This might take some time and some testing. Make the test by rolling the mixture into balls, then it should be ready to be used. Spread the mixture into a baking pan and flatten it. Leave it in the fridge overnight to make it stick together. The next day, take the pan out and cut the mixture into bars.

Enjoy!

raw energy bars DIY

 

Now, what does raw food mean exactly and how do we benefit from eating it? Technically, raw food means that it is not heated up above 48° C. Uncooked, unprocessed food, or let’s just say food, in its most natural state. Although there are several types of raw diets (like raw vegan, raw vegetarian, and even a raw meat diet), they all share the same idea: consuming aliments, which are “alive”, as heating food up above 48°C destroys many of its beneficial components like vitamins and nutrients. So, just to name a few of the main advantages of eating raw:

  • Heating up your food destroys its nutrients and natural enzymes. Enzymes support your digestive system and strengthen your immune system which is essential to fight chronic diseases. Eating raw food therefore helps with digestion, provides good skin appearance and prevents diseases like diabetes, heart attacks, etc.
  • Helps lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the body as raw foods normally contain less saturated and trans fats than packaged and processed foods
  • Saving costs and energy: As no cooking is required, you save a lot of energy which also makes your wallet happy ?
  • Less packaging: main components of a raw food diet are vegetables, fruits and whole grains. You can find most of these on local markets, where they are not packaged, which means less plastic trash and therefore, less garbage. Just make sure to take enough bags with you, as sellers always try to put products into plastic bags (especially here in South America)!

One important thing when eating raw food is to make sure the products you buy and use are organic and of good quality. Sadly, fumigation and the use of huge amounts of pesticides and other chemicals is widespread in our modern world. Consuming contaminated aliments can damage your system and lead to serious illnesses. Don’t be one of those people who is senseless about what they eat and put into their bodies.

Start taking care of yourself, as health is the most important thing we have!

energybars

 

“By eating live foods you create a live body. Live foods contain essential nutrients the body needs to create and maintain energy. Dead foods speed age, decrease ability, and decrease energy … they are useless when dead…” quote Charles de Coti-Marsh

 

About Author: 

heenas-messy-kitchen-logo @ Verena Lippok

Verena Lippok is a passionate vegetarian food blogger, cat lover and world traveller. She is the co-founder of HeenasMessyKitchen.Com. Follow her creative works around healthy foods on Pinterest, instagram and her blog

”Everything you do to your body today affects your future life. So let us give some love to our bodies by living a healthy and fit lifestyle.” – Verena Lippok

Tropical Fruits of Ecuador

If you also embrace diversity and a healthy living then you might be interested into the so called tropical fruits or exotic fruits of this planet. Here in Ecuador the different micro-climates provide a fantastic environment for most of the tropical fruits, to grow very well.

tropical-fruits-ecuador

Our goal with finca PermaTree here within the amazon region of Ecuador, is to grow all of the existing exotic fruits of the planet in one place. Just because we can. And maybe because we the humans are ending natural diversity and this is a growing future issue for the next generations on the planet. We are not here to save the planet or whatever. The planet does not need us. We the planet earth. Back to the tropical fruits a quick overview of the exotic stars within all of them:

  • Annona muricata, Guanábana (Soursop)
  • Artocarpus heterophyllus, Jackfruit (Jackfruit)
  • Vasconcellea × heilbornii, Babaco (Mountain Papaya)
  • Artocarpus altilis, Fruti Pan (Breadfruit)
  • Passiflora edulis, Granadilla (Passionfruit) …
  • Stenocereus/Hylocereus, Pitahaya (Dragon fruit)
  • Annona cherimoya, Cherimoya (Custard Apple)
  • Nahuatl tzapotl, Sapote
  • Alibertia patinoi, Borojo

Additionally many other tropical fruits from Asia also do grow very well in Ecuador such as the Durio zibethinus, Durian fruit tree.

Fruits and vegetables which are growing now at PermaTree ?

Depending on the season you an find: papayas, bananas, plantain, cacao, ice cream bean, sugar cane, pineapple, guava, lemons, guayusa, hierba luisa (lemon grass type), cassava (yuca), wild cherry tomatoes, corn, rosemary, basil, thine, aloe vera, vetiver, neem, noni, naranjilla, zapote and we have been planting guanábanas, mango, avocados, oranges, grapefruits, chirimoya, coconuts, strawberry, maracuya, breadfruit, bamboo (bamboo shoots), macadamia, peach palm (contact), soursop, jackfruit, star fruit and dragon fruit.
Check out our fruit of Ecuador poster here on issuu or visual.ly
https://issuu.com/permatree/docs/fruits_ecuador
and
https://visual.ly/tropical-fruits-ecuador